The History of Thanksgiving

Posted By ColumbiaWestCollege on 12-02-2015 Categories - Blog,

The History of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is here! Thanksgiving is a holiday celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November, and is a time to be with friends and family to give thanks for the blessings in life. For those of you who don’t know much about the holiday, we at Columbia West College have laid out the history behind Thanksgiving and Americans’ favorite ways to celebrate! Read below to learn more about one of the United States’ favorite, most delicious holidays.

The First Thanksgiving

The first Thanksgiving occurred in November 1621, when settlers from Europe, known as Pilgrims, invited Native Americans to share a meal with them. It was three-days of eating, hunting, and other activities to celebrate the Pilgrims’ first successful harvest. Rather than turkey and pumpkin pie, the Pilgrims and Native Americans feasted on venison and corn.

Becoming a Tradition

President George Washington declared Thanksgiving a holiday on Thursday, November 26, 1789. However, it did not become a national tradition until several decades later. American writer Sara Josepha Hale helped to popularize the holiday in the 19th century after reading about and becoming inspired by the first Thanksgiving. She created recipes for turkey, stuffing, and pumpkin pie that are still in use today. In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln finally declared that the United States would celebrate Thanksgiving each year in November. Today, most families celebrate Thanksgiving by preparing a large meal, usually including turkey, stuffing, pumpkin pie, and other seasonal dishes.

Celebrate Thanksgiving with Columbia West College!

Untitled1Columbia West College also loves to celebrate Thanksgiving at our ESL school in Los Angeles by having an amazing potluck with dishes from all over the world! Just check out the pictures! If you are interested in Columbia West College, call us today at (213) 368-3900 or apply online.

Share Post:
FacebookTwitterShare
Share:
  • Logo
  • Logo